Sunrooms By Brady Sunrooms By Brady

January 8, 2013

Should I worry about snow build-up on the roof of my sunroom?

Filed under: Sunrooms — Tags: , , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 12:56 pm

Snowy SunroomSince there are many more windows in a sunroom than in most normal rooms, it’s pretty reasonable to be concerned that it might not be able to support the heavy snow that accumulates all winter long here in New England. The good news is that when it comes to Brady-Built Sunrooms, there’s nothing to worry about.

Every Brady-Built Sunroom is designed for the specific location in which it will be installed. Building codes are very strict about taking snow and wind loads into consideration when designing walls and roofs, including glass surfaces. Brady-Built always designs to exceed the code required loading. In New England, snow load requirements range from 30PSF to 120PSF. When you consider that snow weighs between 7 PCF (pounds per cubic foot) and 20 PCF, the building code assumes a tremendous amount of snow build up on a roof. Wind load requirements range from 90MPH up to 120MPH. In some locations there are special regulations for hurricane loads, and these are also part of our design considerations. (more…)

June 7, 2012

What does low e mean and how does it make glass better?

Filed under: Glass — Tags: , , , , , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 2:09 pm

Sometimes it can be difficult to keep up with all the specific terms and phrases if you aren’t involved in the industry personally. That’s why we want to give you the chance to learn about the products we use and why! Today we explain low e glass and its benefits.

Windows are obviously a very important part of sunrooms!“Low e” is short for “low emissivity” or if you want to get even more accurate, “low thermal emissivity”. Reflectivity is inversely related to emissivity. All materials have a value for reflectivity and emissivity. For instance, a red brick has an emissivity of 0.9 and a reflectance of 0.1. Glass is naturally a high emissivity material with a low reflectance value (when viewed at a 90 degree angle). (more…)

May 3, 2012

Why is Argon used between the sheets of glass on most of the better grade insulating glass?

Filed under: Glass — Tags: , , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 9:35 am

Insulating glass is made with a space separating panes of glass for the same reason people used to install “storm windows” on their houses. Air that does not move is a good insulator. Most insulating materials are designed in a way that traps air to create small pockets of “dead air”. This is true about the fiberglass insulation in your walls, the foam plastic in your beer cooler, as well as your favorite sweater. When two pieces of glass are placed close together and sealed around the edges it creates a layer of dead air in between. If the space between is too wide, the air has room to move, that is why all insulating glass is better than single glass windows with a storm window over it. If the gap is too narrow, there is not enough air to act as an insulator, making it less effective. (more…)

January 4, 2012

What makes our sunroom glass different?

Filed under: Glass — Tags: , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 12:00 pm

We use special Split Silver Titanium Glass in all our sunrooms. Our coating and tinting formulas are optimized for the harsh New England climate so they perform well under a variety of weather conditions and temperatures while maintaining optimum insulating properties all year round.

(more…)

December 1, 2009

Four Seasons of Sun: Glass vs. Lexan Part III

Filed under: Tips — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 2:54 pm

Below is the third article in our series addressing the choice of Lexan and Glass in your sunroom. While both have their advantages and disadvantages, Bob breaks down why some manufacturers do not measure up to Brady-Built quality.

To understand why the glazing systems respond the way they do in summer versus winter, it’s important to know one fundamental element of heating and cooling design.  The amount of energy needed to make a room comfortable is directly proportional to the difference in outdoor temperature versus indoor temperature.

For instance, if you want your house to be 70 degrees on a 10 degree day in January you need enough energy to raise the temperature 60 degrees.  If you want your house to be 70 degrees on a very hot day in the summer, let’s say it is 100 degrees outdoors, you will need only half as much energy to get it to your target temperature of 70 degrees.  This is pretty obvious when you read it, but it has important implications when selecting glass for a sunroom.

Using heavily tinted glass or plastic will help prevent the sun from hitting surfaces in the room, reducing the amount of heat generated in the room, but a significant portion of the sunlight is converted directly into heat energy in the tinted glass.

About half of this heat energy radiates into the sunroom causing the temperatures within the room to rise to levels well above the outdoor temperature.  Though this is a relatively small amount of heat, remember, as I mentioned in the previous paragraph, that much less energy is needed in summer to make a big difference in comfort (or discomfort in this case).

As summer enters its last throes, the days are getting shorter and the nights a bit more chilly. Here at Brady-Built Sunrooms, we continue our work to bring the best and highest quality sunrooms to you. We have a series of articles coming up that will help you prepare for the winter months and help get you valuable information so that you can make the right decision for you and your home.

These articles were written by our General Manager, Robert Wironen, whose knowledge and experience will help guide you through some of the complexities faced when choosing a sunroom. We hope you enjoy these articles and gain helpful information.

October 20, 2009

Four Seasons of Sun: Glass vs. Lexan Part II

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Sunrooms by Brady @ 11:21 am

Below is the second article of four addressing the choice of Lexan and Glass in your sunroom. While both have their advantages and disadvantages, Bob breaks down why some manufacturers do not measure up to Brady-Built quality.

Glass is an extremely hard material. In fact, except for diamonds and other precious gems, and carbides, there are very few materials that are harder. This makes it very resistant to scratching. It also makes it easy to break. To a limited extent the weakness of Lexan is the strength of glass and vise-versa. (more…)

September 7, 2009

Four Seasons of Sun: Glass vs. Lexan

As summer enters its last throes, the days are getting shorter and the nights a bit more chilly. Here at Brady-Built Sunrooms, we continue our work to bring the best and highest quality sunrooms to you. We have a series of articles written by our Registered Architect, Robert Wironen, whose knowledge and experience will help guide you through some of the complexities faced when choosing a sunroom. We hope you enjoy these articles and gain helpful information.

Below is the first article addressing the choice of Lexan and Glass in your sunroom. While both have their advantages and disadvantages, Bob breaks down why some manufacturers do not measure up to Brady-Built quality.

Polycarbonate which is commonly known by GE’s brand name, Lexan is an extremely tough plastic that has been used in many applications from helmets to car headlights to bullet proof glazing to eyeglass lenses. The characteristics that make it so well suited for the applications I mentioned are also one of its weaknesses. (more…)

September 2, 2009

Brady-Built of New England Changes Name to Reflect Growing Business

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

For more information, contact:

Robert Wironen, General Manager

508-798-2600, ext. 31

bob@bradyrooms.com

Brady-Built of New England Changes Name to Reflect Growing Business

Auburn, Mass. Brady-Built of New England has changed its name to Brady-Built Sunrooms to reflect the growth of its business into regions outside New England. According to Robert Wironen, General Manager of custom year-round sunrooms and conservatories builder, Marvic, Inc., doing business as Brady-Built Sunrooms, the company has grown over the past several years and increased its sales in a number of states outside New England, including New Jersey, New York, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Michigan.

“Our custom-built sunrooms and conservatories are all designed to withstand the rigors of New England weather,” says Wironen. “So it stands to reason that they’d be popular in other areas of the country with similarly harsh conditions.”  According to Wironen what makes Brady-Built sunrooms and conservatories so popular is their quality design and construction. “Unlike many of our competitors, we build every sunroom right here in our own environmentally-controlled factory,” adds Wironen. “And we’re the only manufacturer that uses structural silicone glazing so that there is a permanent weather-tight seal between the glass and the sunroom frame, unlike our competition’s.”

For more information about Brady-Built sunrooms and conservatories, and to arrange a factory tour and demonstration, call 508-798-2600 or 1-877-77-BRADY, www.sunroomsbybrady.com.

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